October 25, 2014
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Bold fox struts stuff at Conimicut
Andrew Foerch
NEW RESIDENT: John Marinatto grabbed this shot of Conimicut’s latest resident.

A furry creature has moved into the Conimicut beach community, having been sighted multiple times strolling confidently down Charles Street in broad daylight.

Conimicut resident John Marinatto first saw the animal from inside his home, as it was walking right up on his deck on Shawomet Avenue. He saw it once more under a neighbor’s shed, and again sauntering down his street just days later. He suspected the creature was a coyote. His worry arose due to the fact that the shoreline neighborhood is a regular tourist location where people bring their young children to play on spring and summer days.

“I was concerned enough to call Warwick Animal Control…just because I was worried about the kids,” said Marinatto.

He was redirected to the Warwick Department of Environmental Management (DEM), which was able to positively identify the animal as a red fox.

However, there is no reason to be particularly anxious or apprehensive with regards to the fox. Charles Brown of the Fish & Wildlife division of the Warwick DEM said that in most circumstances the fox would either run away from a human or perhaps take a watchful glance to ensure its safety.

“Foxes are raised in and live in an environment where people are present, so they don’t necessarily see us as a natural threat,” said Brown, explaining the casual nature of the fox in the residential area.

According to Brown, fox sightings can be attributed to the time of year. Spring is the season when fox have kits, so Conimicut’s furry visitor is in all likelihood looking for a food source to bring back to its offspring.

Not to worry, however, for the safety of you or your kids. Foxes typically eat small mammals, birds and insects and would ordinarily never attack a human, simply due to our size.

In efforts to keep the fox away from one’s property, Brown said, “The best thing to do is limit the availability of easily accessed food sources, like pet food, bird seed and even compost.”

If confronted by the fox, just remember, it is more afraid of you than you are of it. Making yourself as large and loud as possible will almost certainly drive the creature away, Brown recommends.


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