Retired Naval officer to present lecture series on WWII in Pacific

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See World War II through the eyes of a military expert, Dr. Stanley Carpenter, Professor of Strategy and Policy at the U.S. Naval War College, on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. for a lecture series on World War II in the Pacific from the attack on Pearl Harbor to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On September 11, experience “Tora, Tora, Tora! Pearl Harbor and the Coming of War in the Pacific.” On September 18, witness “Miracle at Midway: Turning of the Tide.” On September 25, endure “Palm Trees, Jungle, and Bugs! War in the South Pacific.” On October 2, make the final push “On to Japan: Island Hopping Across the Pacific.” On October 9, sit back for Dr. Carpenter’s WWII movie pick Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970). See the events that led to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor told from both the American and Japanese sides. Carpenter is a retired United States Naval Officer and an expert on British Military and Naval History. For more information, call 739-5440, x9758. The library is located at 600 Sandy Lane. This event is free and open to all.

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Justanidiot

Ah, the good old days when America was man enough to pull the nuclear trigger.

Tuesday, September 4
JohnStark

Good point, idiot, and it's a good thing we did. The inevitable invasion of mainland Japan was likely to cost 2 million allied lives by conservative estimates, and up to 10 million Japanese lives (mostly civilian). The invasions of Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined killed about 120,000, with another 100,000 dead in the following months. "Pulling the trigger" likely saved well over 11 million lives, so thanks for pointing it out.

Tuesday, September 4
Justanidiot

So lets man up and start nuking today's problem countries back into the stone age.

Wednesday, September 5
ThatGuyInRI

Not to put too fine a point on it justanidiot but those were Atomic weapons dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, not nuclear weapons.

It's how the weapon functions and kilotons versus megatons, a bit of a difference.

Wednesday, September 5